Space Needle Stuff #4 – Pepper Mill

This is a find I found years ago.  It is missing the top spire stopper so it is not complete. However, it is pretty cool in how it is constructed. I have never risked using it, so I can’t say if it works very well.

A little fact for everyone is during the fair the Space Needle had a flame on top of it which made it taller than today.

When the fair opened, the Space Needle was 607.88 feet above the bench mark at its base and 740.98 feet above sea level. The Space Needle initially had a 50-foot tower atop on a tripod of tubular stainless steel. Fair promoters advertised it had enough natural gas to heat 125 homes. But that was removed after the fair, making it a little shorter.  Today the Space Needle’s aircraft warning beacon is at 605 feet.

My little pepper mill is technically missing its torch.   That is a hot peppered fact!!

Space Needle Pepper Mill top

Space Needle Pepper Mill top

Seattle Space Needle Pepper Mill bottom

Seattle Space Needle Pepper Mill bottom

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Space Needle Stuff #3 – Model in a box

The third item is a perfect replica of the Needle.  It is made of some bronze metal and came in its original box.  The box is just as pristine as the model.   It is very colorful and outshines the model I think.   This was a little more expensive at around 45 bucks.   Good investment though.  One has to grab what one finds at the moment or it will get away and never be seen again.   That is the worlds fair hunt!

Space Needle Stuff #2 – Salt & Pepper

Space Needle salt and pepper set was a recent find.  I figured when I saw these online at an estate sale that they would be gone by the time I got there.   Funny thing, they didn’t catch anyone else’s eye and I snagged them for 20 bucks.  Guess everyone is chasing the more expensive glass tumblers these days.

This little set is pink and has a 60’s flavor.  They are what is called old new stock still in the original box.  Can’t beat that for a great Seattle Worlds Fair find.

Space Needle Stuff #1 – Decanter

The Seattle Worlds Fair gave my fair city its iconic landmark, the Space Needle.  Today it still rotates above the skyline and provides majestic views and dinner to those that visit.

One of the most common themes for 1962 Century 21 Worlds Fair memorabilia is the Needle.   Here is a small series of items I have picked up over the years.

First – the Jim Beam Decanter.   The distillery has made decanters of all kinds of things.   This piece of Worlds Fair memorabilia is pretty common and goes for around 50 bucks if you can find one.  Since the 50th anniversary, the pickings for items has dried up.   Used to see these regularly before 2012.   Folks got savvy to what they had.  Mine was a gift from a fellow collector, so it is even more special.

Space Needle Decanter with Washington theme

Space Needle Decanter with Washington theme

Aerospace theme side of Jim Beam Space Needle

Aerospace theme side of Jim Beam Space Needle

Fourth side of Space Needle decanter with PNW forest and mountains

Fourth side of Space Needle decanter with PNW forest and mountains

Century 21 Rocket Bank

This mechanical coin bank is a small treasure from the Seattle Worlds Fair.  The only way we know that it was from the Fair is the Century 21 Logo that was added to it.  See it there towards the top.

Coin Mechanism on Rocket Bank

Coin Mechanism on Rocket Bank

It has a push button device that launches the coin up into the bank.   The coin will slide up under the rocket head like a little missile.  To help you visualize that I took a video of how it all works.

The bank was manufactured by Astro Mfg Co and was made in the USA.   I found another blog that gave me some details of the bank which is a 1957 creation.  Big thank you to collectorsweekly.com for this info:

The Guided Missile Bank, a Berzac Creation made by Astro Mfg, (patent filed by John Berzac in 1957.) John Berzac and his brother Steven left Duro Mold to start their own company, Astro Mold, in 1957. This bank most resembles a conventional rocket, and came in the 4 metallic shades as well as the blue-grey. While most were give-aways to persons opening new bank accounts, the much rarer gold versions were given to those who opened premium accounts. It came in two basic configurations: One with pegs on the fins to accommodate red rubber boots and one without the pegs, having a flat finish. This bank also was offered as an un-painted version which was designed to be “customized” by the buyer, complete with paper decals. The Missile Bank had a similar firing mechanism as the previous models, but the locking “plug” was actually the rocket nozzles at the bottom of the rocket. Produced just after the two Berzac brothers left Duro, over two million of these were sold worldwide as this new company’s debut model. Missile Banks with no sign of a label were more than likely salesman’s samples. A one-of-a-kind matte green model is in the possession of the Berzac family.

A Missile Bank which sat in president Kennedy’s Oval Office back in the day eventually ended up with his secretary and finally sold just last year at a Heritage auction for just over $1,900.

Close up of Rocket Fins

Close up of Rocket Fins and patents – see how this one has the feet

Side view showing Symbol

Side view showing Symbol

Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition Scarf

AYP was the first Worlds Fair in Seattle.  It was hosted at what is now the University of Washington campus in 1909.  It was originally going to be in 1907 to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush but Jamestown Exposition was that year, so Seattle postponed.  Apx 3.7 million people attended the event.

Alaska Yukon Pacific Expo Scarf in silver silk

Alaska Yukon Pacific Expo Scarf in silver silk

This treasured momento was a silver silk scarf that our fair goer had her name embroidered on it.  We know her as only Gaby.   The scarf has a picture of the US Government building as the center of the motif.

Gaby had her name embroidered on this scarf

Gaby had her name embroidered on this scarf

The scarf was probably left folded for over 100 years and this contributed to some of the condition issues it has.   Also, the type of silk it was made of combined with creasing has created tear like areas in the fabric.

AYP scarf suffers from shattered silk issues

AYP scarf suffers from shattered silk issues

This is often called shattered silk.    Wiki gives us this nice explanation of what that is.

In some cases, the textiles are weakened not by outside causes such as light or pests, but by chemical reactions taking place within the fabric itself, such as the oxidation of iron-based mordants over time.

One example which is cited frequently throughout the literature is the case of “shattered silk.” During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many silk manufacturers treated their fabrics with metallic salts (usually containing tin and iron) to give them a heavier, more luxurious feel. However, as these fabrics have aged, the metals in the fibres have accelerated their decay and caused them to become extremely brittle. The shredded or “shattered” effect this causes is the reason for the name. In this case, the environment of the textile contributes very little to the deterioration from the metallic salts, though exposure to light may accelerate it even further.

Here is one last shot of the scarf with rulers so you can see it’s size a little better.

AYP Scarf - 19" x 19"

AYP Scarf – 19″ x 19″